Collecting Breadboard.

Январь 9th, 2012


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Shaving Horse

Январь 9th, 2012

Over the years we have had a number of requests for shaving horse plans, spawned perhaps by the renewed interest in hand methods of woodworking. The shaving horse was an important tool in pre-power tool times, and was often customized to best suit the type of work for which it would be used. Although we suspect that this particular shaving horse, which is from the Hancock Shaker Village Museum, was used by a cooper (barrel maker), it has all the common shaving horse features and should serve well for most any drawknife work.
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Shaving Horse. part 2.

Январь 9th, 2012

The arm is designed to pivot open when foot pressure is removed, releasing the workpiece. Although we are not absolutely certain of its purpose, we believe that the dowel pin (part I) was intended as a locking mechanism to hold the arm in a fixed position. Because this feature would only be useful in a production environment, when working on repetitive tasks with material of the same thickness, this pin and the hole for it can be eliminated.
To make the shaving horse, first cut stock for parts A through M. Any hardwood can be used. If you do not have a lathe, the turned parts (B and F) can be made square. Use standard dowel stock for the pins (parts H, I, and J) and sand or shave the slight taper on these pieces.
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Toy Truck

Январь 9th, 2012

This combination cab-over, semi-trailer, and flatbed truck set is sure to delight any youngster. It is easy to make and well suited to limited production, such as for craft fairs.
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Tips 1.

Январь 9th, 2012

Wavy veneer must be moistened slightly before pressing flat. One of those spray pump plastic containers (such as a «Windex» bottle) is ideal for applying a fine spray of water. Be sure to thoroughly clean before using.

A thin coat of paste wax applied to the top of your table saw will help stock slide smoothly.
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Pivot-top Game/Coffee Table

Февраль 5th, 2012

This contemporary game/coffee table is one of the best looking pieces we have seen in a long time. Although we can only describe them to you, the beautiful colors in the contrasting Carpathian elm and white ash burl game board faces (available from Constantine’s; see Bill of Materials) are striking indeed.
The coffee table is unique in that its pivoting top actually makes it two tables in one. The opposite side of the top is a plain ash veneer, also available from Constantine’s. The design of the table incorporates an interesting split-turning technique which will be explained later.
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Pivot-top Game/Coffee Table. Part 2.

Февраль 5th, 2012

Now, lay two of the four particle board pieces on your workbench (with the edges flush) and cover the top piece with wax paper. Note that the «good» side of the game veneer is covered with tape. In order to flatten it, you’ll first need to moisten the opposite or «down» side with a mixture of glycerine (available at any drug store) and water. Mix one part glycerine and two parts water and pour the solution into an old plastic spray bottle (see shop tip on page 51). Spray the «down» side of the veneer so that the entire surface is moistened, but not so much that it becomes soaked. Now place it on the wax paper, cover it with more wax paper and place the remaining two sheets of particle board on top.
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Pivot-top Game/Coffee Table. Part 3.

Февраль 5th, 2012

Once again, lay two of the particle board pieces on the workbench and cover with wax paper. Place the flattened game board on the wax paper, good side down, then place the plywood on top and align the edges. Now lay the ash veneer (C), good side up, on the plywood, again aligning the edges. Add more wax paper to the top, then use the caul cleats to apply clamp pressure. Apply the center cleat first and work toward each end with the remaining cleats. It’s important to apply pressure to as much of the surface as is possible, so if you have any C-clamps saw can be used to rip the opposite edge. If your table saw can’t crosscut 24 in. wide stock, you’ll need to use the router to make the end cuts.


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Pivot-top Game/Coffee Table. Part 4.

Февраль 5th, 2012

The top can now be final sanded, with several coats of Watco Danish Oil applied as a final finish.

All legs and aprons are made on the lathe using a technique called split turning. In short, a split turning consists of stock glued with paper in between to form a blank. After turning, a chisel is used to split the blank apart at the paper seam to produce four duplicate parts.
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Pivot-top Game/Coffee Table. Part 5.

Февраль 5th, 2012

The notch for the locking pin is cut on the side aprons (J) as shown in Fig. 5, then the 5/16 in. diameter hole is bored at a point 5/16 in. from the top edge (Fig. 6). Use the drill press with a stop block to insure that all four holes are in the same location. Also use the same set up to bore the pivot pin hole on the end apron (K).
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Settle Bench

Февраль 5th, 2012

The settle bench was a convenient article of furniture in the colonial home, doubling as both a table and bench. This bench, which can be built from either pine or hardwood, is an excellent example of traditional Colonial style craftsmanship. It includes the most desirable settle bench features: the wide pivoting tabic top, and the hinged seat board opening to a storage compartment below.
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Settle Bench. Part 2.

Февраль 5th, 2012

After the top has been made fasten it securely to the two cross braces (K). Because the fastening system used here must accommodate movement across the width of the top, we have chosen to use screws inserted through the top, countersunk and then plugged. A fixed center screw is inserted to equalize movement, while the outer screw hoies are elongated (slotted) to accommodate this movement. The fastening detail shows a cross section of these slotted screw holes. When elongating the screw holes take care that they are indeed slotted and not merely enlarged, lest the screw shoulder have no surface to bear on.
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