Pivot-top Game/Coffee Table

Февраль 5th, 2012
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This contemporary game/coffee table is one of the best looking pieces we have seen in a long time. Although we can only describe them to you, the beautiful colors in the contrasting Carpathian elm and white ash burl game board faces (available from Constantine’s; see Bill of Materials) are striking indeed.
The coffee table is unique in that its pivoting top actually makes it two tables in one. The opposite side of the top is a plain ash veneer, also available from Constantine’s. The design of the table incorporates an interesting split-turning technique which will be explained later.
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Tips 1.

Январь 9th, 2012

Wavy veneer must be moistened slightly before pressing flat. One of those spray pump plastic containers (such as a «Windex» bottle) is ideal for applying a fine spray of water. Be sure to thoroughly clean before using.

A thin coat of paste wax applied to the top of your table saw will help stock slide smoothly.
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Toy Truck

Январь 9th, 2012

This combination cab-over, semi-trailer, and flatbed truck set is sure to delight any youngster. It is easy to make and well suited to limited production, such as for craft fairs.
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Shaving Horse. part 2.

Январь 9th, 2012

The arm is designed to pivot open when foot pressure is removed, releasing the workpiece. Although we are not absolutely certain of its purpose, we believe that the dowel pin (part I) was intended as a locking mechanism to hold the arm in a fixed position. Because this feature would only be useful in a production environment, when working on repetitive tasks with material of the same thickness, this pin and the hole for it can be eliminated.
To make the shaving horse, first cut stock for parts A through M. Any hardwood can be used. If you do not have a lathe, the turned parts (B and F) can be made square. Use standard dowel stock for the pins (parts H, I, and J) and sand or shave the slight taper on these pieces.
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Shaving Horse

Январь 9th, 2012

Over the years we have had a number of requests for shaving horse plans, spawned perhaps by the renewed interest in hand methods of woodworking. The shaving horse was an important tool in pre-power tool times, and was often customized to best suit the type of work for which it would be used. Although we suspect that this particular shaving horse, which is from the Hancock Shaker Village Museum, was used by a cooper (barrel maker), it has all the common shaving horse features and should serve well for most any drawknife work.
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Collecting Breadboard.

Январь 9th, 2012


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Computer Desk . part 2.

Январь 9th, 2012

The computer desk is easy and inexpensive to build. Although we used oak, both for its strength and because oak veneer plywood is commonly available, almost any hardwood can be used. As shown in the plywood cutting diagram (Fig. 1), all the plywood pieces (the three shelves: parts A, B, and C; and the main shelf backing strips: parts D and E) can be cut from one half sheet of plywood. All the other parts for the desk can be cut with the table saw from standard 3/4 in. stock, When cutting the plywood use a plywood blade to provide a smooth cut and help prevent chip-out along the edges. Next, cut all the hardwood components, parts F through P. Half-lap the feet (L) and legs (M and N) as shown in the half-lap detail (Fig. 2), and notch the back legs to accept the two stretchers (O) as shown in the stretcher detail (Fig. 3).
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Computer Desk

Январь 9th, 2012

We held back as long as we could, but the computer revolution has finally penetrated even here to The Woodworker’s Journal. So, here it is at last — our computer desk. Although we know that many Journal readers own computers, it was our intention when designing this project to offer a piece that would also serve well as a regular desk for those readers who do not have a computer. We believe that the end product of our research is a handsome, versatile, functional design, whether you use it for a computer or as a traditional desk.
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Gate-leg table. part 3.

Январь 9th, 2012

For the final assembly begin by making the two end frame and the two pivot leg assemblies. Also join the two side stretchers with the two remaining cross stretchers. Now join the end assemblies, the lower stretcher assembly and the side aprons to make the table frame. Note that the grooves in these side aprons, cut to accept the drawer guide support, are purposely cut oversize (long). This is done so the guide support can be angled into place after the table frame has been assembled. The drawer guide is also mounted at this time, although it should not be permanently glued until the drawer has been test-fitted for smooth opening and closing. A little paraffin on the guide will reduce friction and wear.
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Gate-leg table. part 2.

Январь 9th, 2012

The upper apron assembly (parts В and С), end rails (D), pivot rail (H), and the drawer guide support (M) and drawer guide (N) are all standard mortise and tenon construction. Refer to the apron and rail tenon details for the specific dimensions of these tenons and to figure the corresponding mortises in the legs. When making the upper of the two end rails (D), note that several slotted and countersunk screw holes must be added in this piece, which also serves as a cleat for mounting the top. The top and leaves are made by gluing up stock, with the leaves then rounded out with a saber saw. Refer to the Special Techniques feature beginning on page 22 for detailed instructions on how to make the rule joint shown in the rule joint detail.
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Gate-leg table

Январь 9th, 2012

The gate-leg table is a classic furniture design, one that is characteristic of and first became popular during the William and Mary period. Although our table is not an authentic William and Mary antique, it is a fine turn-of-the-century reproduction in the William and Mary style. The table is from the collection of The Washington Historical Museum, a fascinating museum of Early American, Colonial, and period furnishings located in the picturesque little town of Washington, Connecticut.
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Furniture Periods and Styles William and Mary, 1690-1725. part 2

Январь 9th, 2012


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