Archive for the ‘woodworking’ Category

Special Techniques Making the Rule Joint. part 2.

Понедельник, Январь 9th, 2012
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No matter which technique is used, the first and most important step is to correctly lay out the position of the joint. There are two key elements to consider: the hinge location and the coordinates of the radius. The thickness of the stock and the size of the bits or cutters can also be factored in, however for practical purposes we have assumed that the stock thickness will be in the area of 3/4 to 1 in., a range which encompasses the thicknesses of most common table-tops. Although theoretically the bit or cutter is determined by the stock thickness, we have found that matching 1.2i in. cove and round-over bits or cutters can be used to shape a nearly perfect rule joint in stock 3/4 to 1 in. thick. As shown in Fig. 1 the only difference will be a deeper shoulder on the thicker material.
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Special Techniques Making the Rule Joint. part 3.

Понедельник, Январь 9th, 2012

Fig. 3 shows a basic formula for locating and cutting a typical rule joint when the hinges are to be mortised in place, as they usually are. Distance A is one-half the knuckle diameter. Distances В and С are the radii of the joint and are, of course, equal to the bit or cutter size, which we have set at a constant 1/2; in. Distance D is the shoulder depth and corresponding lip thickness, which should not be less than 1/2, in. The critical point to know in all this technical talk is this: for the rule joint to open and close smoothly the center or pivot point of the hinge knuckle should be located near the intersecting point of radius lines В and C. In actual practice, when mounting the hinge it helps to cheat a little and install the knuckle a hair (‘/2 in.) toward the leaf side of the joint.
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Special Techniques Making the Rule Joint

Понедельник, Январь 9th, 2012

The rule joint is a traditional fine furniture feature used most commonly with tables having one or more drop leaves. When properly executed the joint makes for an especially attractive detail along the edges where the hinged leaves and fixed table surface meet. The design of the joint serves to effectively conceal the hinge plate whether the leaves are in the open or closed position.
The term «rule joint» is believed to have derived from the brass bound folding boxwood rules that were popular from the 1600’s on. The knuckles where these rules folded closely resembled the rule joint. By the time of the William and Mary period the rule joint was quite common.
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Таble Saw Basics. part6

Понедельник, Январь 9th, 2012

If your fence has a width-of-cut scale, set it by measuring from a right blade tooth to the fence. This scale is a rough guide at best and should not be relied on except for rough work. For critical work (and most of it is) use a good steel rule to measure the exact distance the fence should be set from a tooth on the right side of the blade.
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Таble Saw Basics. part5

Понедельник, Январь 9th, 2012

Crosscut a board with the miter gauge set at zero and use your square to check the squareness of the end of the board (Fig. 8).

Now check the blade for a true 45 degree incline by loosening the tilt handle and cranking the blade over to the left as far as it will go. Use your combination square (less the blade) to check the angle of the saw blade (Fig. 9). Again, the blade should rest flush against the inclined face of the square and the pointer should read 45 degrees. If necessary, reset the left-hand stop collar at the back of the machine. Crosscut a board with the blade inclined and check the accuracy of this edge miter cut.
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Таble Saw Basics. part4

Понедельник, Январь 9th, 2012

Choose a 1 x 6 x 16 in. piece of pine for the test cut and make the first cut (called a face miter) as shown in Fig. 6. Check for accuracy with a combination square. It should be perfect, but if it isn’t, repeat the procedure for adjusting the miter gauge.
Turn the miter gauge to the opposite 45 degree setting and make another test cut, using the right-hand table slot and again check the cut with the combination square.
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Таble Saw Basics. part3

Суббота, Январь 7th, 2012

While holding the board firmly against the gauge, push the gauge with the right hand, feeding the work slowly and steadily until the cut is complete, then withdraw both the work and the gauge to the front of the table and turn off the motor. You have just completed a basic crosscutting operation used to trim a board to length across the grain at (we hope) 90 degrees to the edges (Fig. 4).
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Таble Saw Basics. part2

Суббота, Январь 7th, 2012

Now slide the square to the rear of the blade (where it emerges from the table insert) and rotate the blade backward until the marked tooth again contacts the square. If the tooth doesn’t touch the square the same amount, the saw blade is obviously out of parallel with the gauge slots. To correct this, trunnion bolts underneath the table, which hold the entire tilt mechanism to the table, must be loosened so that either the front and rear trunnions or the table can be shifted slightly about the axis of the saw blade to bring the blade and table slots parallel. Repeat the check with the square and, if everything looks good, tighten the bolts carefully. After tightening, again check to make sure nothing shifted.
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Таble Saw Basics

Суббота, Январь 7th, 2012


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Restoring Antiques. part3

Суббота, Январь 7th, 2012

A recent article in Fine Woodworking magazine described how a man in British Columbia blew up his house by pouring gasoline down the kitchen sink. Seems he had been cleaning paint brushes. The fumes found a dry trap in the basement and migrated across the basement floor to the water heater. Bang. Up went the house. We must all take proper precautions when using these materials.
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Restoring Antiques. part2

Суббота, Январь 7th, 2012

Ihave used compressor driven air guns for many years. I started out with a small low-cost diaphragm type air pump and a one pint bleeder type gun. The air pump has long since been traded off but the one pint gun is still my favorite for small to medium-size projects. It has been converted to a non-bleeder type gun to go with the larger compressor I now have. It still does a very creditable job. This type of gun is made by many manufacturers but an air brush would serve the same purposes. The larger one-quart size gun comes in a wide variety of types and models. However, a complete review of all of these guns isn’t the purpose of this article. Suffice it to say that if you are interested, the retailers of this equipment can furnish you with more literature than can be comfortably read in a week’s spare time. If you acquire one of these guns, be sure to thoroughly digest all of the descriptive and instructional material that comes with it. Pay particular attention to spray pattern adjustments and how to obtain the correct viscosity for the material to be sprayed.
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Restoring Antiques

Суббота, Январь 7th, 2012

Asprayed-on finish, properly applied, will result in a smooth and even surface that can’t be easily matched with a brush. Add to that the fact that a piece can be sprayed three to five times faster than it can be coated with a brush and you have a couple of good arguments for considering the purchase of a spray gun — particularly if you do a lot of finishing. Spraying is especially helpful if you regularly finish (or refinish) furniture that includes a lot of spindle turnings — the kind, for example, found on a Colonial Windsor chair. Using a gun, an experienced sprayer can finish three or four of these chairs while a fast brush man will do one.
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